Health Care Reform Trivia Part I: U.S. Health Care Compared to the Rest of the World

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Hi Readers – I’ve been doing some research for an upcoming post about the impact of the Affordable Care Act on people with chronic illnesses. Along the way, I’ve come across bits of information I found interesting that I thought I’d share. Here’s part I in a series of health care trivia…stay tuned for Parts II and III – Rachel

 

Average life expectancy in the U.S. in 2010: 78.2
In 34 OECD* countries: 79.5 (more…)

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504 Plans for Students with Chronic Illnesses: A Guide for Parents and Students

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When my son, Aaron was 11 and needed help in school to deal with his migraines and Crohn’s Disease, I didn’t know what a 504 plan was.  Aaron attended two different schools during the first two years of his diagnosis. In both schools, the guidance counselors were not sure whether or how 504 plans were used to help students with chronic illnesses. We were given a lot of misinformation, and little help for our son.  I researched 504 plans, and spoke with other parents, a social worker, and a lawyer—all who had experience with the rights of students with chronic illnesses.  We got a 504 plan in place for Aaron, which has helped him a great deal in school. I hope this guide helps other parents and students, so they do not have to dig as much for answers. (more…)

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Aiming for an Equal Education…Despite Our Illnesses

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Please share your comments, stories, and ideas!  I’d love to hear about your experiences dealing with a chronic illness in schools. Did you get the help you needed from the school? Did your school “get it?” Do you think anything needs to be improved on the treatment of students with chronic illnesses in their schools? — Rachel

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A growing number of students have chronic illnesses. If you count all types of chronic illnesses, at least 10 to 15 percent of American kids have been diagnosed with them, according to the National Institute of Health. Nine percent of children ages 5 to 17, have one or more chronic illnesses that limit their activities to some extent (2012, Childstats.gov).

(more…)

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The U.S. Department of Education Provides Guidance on Including Students with Disabilities in Sports Programs

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 Kids with disabilities—including chronic illnesses—have had the right to take part in extracurricular activities since at least the 1970’s when Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act was passed. But a June 2010 study by the Government Accounting Office (GAO) showed that students with disabilities have not been given equal access to extracurricular sports programs.  (more…)

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Chronic Action’s Mission

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The United States has seen several civil rights movements. We are now aware of the need for equal rights for people of different races, sexes, sexual orientation, and people with visible disabilities.  The struggles of these groups continue, but their efforts to raise awareness, change attitudes and change laws have made steady progress, improving the quality of life and increasing opportunities for many people.  I am optimistic that our society is evolving toward a more accepting one, that allows for more understanding and equality.

There is yet another civil and human rights movement in its infancy that demands our attention.  (more…)

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